Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children Movie Review

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Tim Burton is one of my favourite directors. His latest movie, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, is yet another adaptation, following previous works such as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Alice in Wonderland, and my personal favourite, Big Fish.

Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children. Source: 20th Century Fox
Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children. Source: 20th Century Fox

The movie follows the story of Jacob (Asa Butterfield), a Florida teenager who grew up on his grandfather’s tales of peculiar children in far away lands whom he used to visit and live with.

Following an untimely tragedy, Jacob decides to set out and find the characters in his Grandfather’s tales, eventually meeting the peculiar children and learning about their powers.

The film has an all star cast.

With frequent Burton collaborator Eva Green playing the role of Miss Peregrine, Samuel L. Jackson playing the antagonist, Barron, and even a cheeky cameo from Judi Dench, who plays Miss Avocet.

Visually, the movie is incredible.

The sets and locations are perfect, the costuming is fun, and the characters keep things very interesting (seriously one girl has a mouth at the back of her head…).

Burton has an incredible flare for redesigning characters from literature to make them aesthetically dazzling for the screen.

The lead shoes worn by Emma Bloom (Ella Purnell) are funky as hell, and the monster’s lanky aesthetic and pinstripe suits look super swaggy (and not too dissimilar from Jack Skellington, another famed Burton character).

For the most part I really enjoyed the film. It had everything I love about Burton written all over it.

That being said, the ending had me a little let down. The film was part set in 1943, and all the scenes pertaining to that era were spot on. However, when the story was taken into the 21st century near the film’s close, Burton began to use really contemporary doof music to score the film, which ended up removing me from the fantasy he had spent most the film setting up. I know it might seem small, but the change in music seemed so polarising that it ruined the flow.

Jacob and Emma going for a stroll. Source: 20th Century Fox
The peculiar children. Source: 20th Century Fox

But I can’t complain too much.

After all, Burton did make it up to me by throwing in a little stop-motion sequence, which was totally awesome, and a nice reminder of his creative origins.

The film was a lot of fun, I really would recommend everyone go see it.

But before I sign off I have a quick plea to the man himself. I really wish Burton would stop relying on remakes and adaptations. Earlier this year he released Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass, now this. I would love to see him come out with an original.

I miss the good old days of Edward Scissorhands and Beetlejuice. I’m quite certain that if he put his mind to it, he could come up with some really crazy and fun ideas.

Rating: 7/10

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