Dissidia Opera Omnia vs Dissidia NT: Which Final Fantasy Game’s Better?

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Final Fantasy fans are loving Dissidia NT. But its mobile counterpart Opera Omnia is giving it a run for its money.

The Dissidia Final Fantasy franchise seems to be taking over the world of gaming, with titles spread across home consoles, portable consoles, arcades, and mobile. Mobile games were once geared towards casual players. PC and Console were the realm of the more serious gamer. This is changing.

The two most recent Dissidia games are a perfect example of the change. After an early release in Japan, NT and Opera Omnia have finally reached Western players. NT is a brawler for the Playstation 4. Opera Omnia is a mobile game in a more classic RPG style. Some players are loving the 3v3 battles of NT. Others prefer Opera Omnia. A few have even gone so far as to call it a better game.

So.. is it?

The Dissidia Battle

Ideally, NT and Opera Omnia are supposed to complement, not compete with each other. The few similarities between the two games reflect this.

Both games include an all-star cast of characters from the Final Fantasy series. Those characters then become caught up in a conflict between two Gods: Spiritus and Materia.

Like other previous entries in the Dissidia Final Fantasy series, both use ‘Bravery Points’ and ‘Brave Attacks’ in their battle system.

This is where the similarities end.

Though both games feature conflict between the Gods, how and why this conflict arises is quite different. How and why the Final Fantasy heroes become involved also varies between the two. And while certain mechanics are similar, the gameplay itself is massively different.

These differences are to be expected. After all, NT and Opera Omnia have been released on entirely different formats. But which differences are so big that they have fans claiming that a mobile title is better than a console release?

These are the major arguments surrounding the Final Fantasy Opera Omnia vs Final Fantasy NT debate.

1 – Story… or lack there of.

Dissidia
Square Enix

Many of the arguments against Dissidia NT centre around its lack of story, or rather, disappointment at how the story is represented. The first two Dissidia games, released on PSP, had a rich story to go with the epic battles.

NT has a story, but there is no traditional single-player Story Mode to play through. Instead, the focus is on online multiplayer battles, or elaborate Boss Battles. Chapters of the story are unlocked via achievements in these battles. They are cut-scenes to be viewed, rather than played.

2 – Simple, but more player involvement.

Opera Omnia‘s story is bare bones by Final Fantasy standards. But it is playable. The battles are more strongly tied to events in the story, unlocked as the player completes quests.

The game also allows the option of choosing which quests and side-quests to complete first. This gives the player some influence over how the story plays out, as opposed to being a simple observer to story elements. This is one of the ways some fans see Opera Omnia as an improvement over NT.

3 – All-Star casts

Dissidia
Square Enix

As I mentioned earlier, these games, like every title in the Dissidia series, build their cast with Final Fantasy characters. But where NT mostly keeps to the main protagonists or biggest names, Opera Omnia casts the net a little wider.

Opera Omnia does include popular Final Fantasy leads such as Cloud Strife and Zidane Tribal. However, just as much of the game’s cast is made up of much-loved supporting players. These include the kind-hearted black mage Vivi from Final Fantasy IX, or Laguna Loire from Final Fantasy VIII, among many others.

The best part of all?

4 – Opera Omnia’s characters are completely free to access.

Square Enix do plan on adding more playable characters to Dissidia NT, hoping to eventually build the roster to 50. Unfortunately, most of these new characters swill come in the form of paid DLC. This might make them harder to obtain for any cash-strapped fans.

Opera Omnia does not have this problem. While you can pay for extra gems and other items, players strategic and patient enough should not have to.

Characters do not have to be paid for at all. Most are simply unlockable as you discover them in the story. Special characters are unlocked by playing through the events in which they appear.

So, which Dissidia is best?

In the end, it’s all just a matter of preference. NT and Opera Omnia are different. Both have their positives and negatives, but neither one is really better or worse.

If you’re a fan of fighting games, NT is for you.

If you are more of a classic RPG fan, however, Opera Omnia is probably your game.

For some players, such as myself, which game they will prefer probably varies on a day to day basis. Some days I’ll want an adventure, in which case I’d play Opera Omnia. In need of a good brawl? I’ll whack in NT.

One thing I know for certain though is that they are both great games, and both worthy of the Final Fantasy legacy.

If you like controversially comparing games, have a read of this article comparing PUBG and Fortnite.

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