Was Command and Conquer: Red Alert the best game ever?

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Command and Conquer, and in particular Red Alert was a fantastic strategy game, one of my favourite games ever.

It so often goes under the radar when thinking of iconic games, but it’s had such an impact on my life.

In business, you need to build things, and there’s often a certain structure to how these things should be built. You can’t do anything without building money, and you need help and team members with specific skills to help carry out your goals. It’s the same in Red Alert as in Command and Conquer.

Strategies included building your refineries and harvesters to drive revenue, which could be spent on units,  buildings, and then upgrades. All of this was a step by step process in much the same way as the even more popular Civilization games.

Red Alert, was a recipe and template for any business, and for being an entrepreneur.

If you have never played it, I recommend downloading a copy of 1 and 2 and maybe also a bit of the Command and Conquer series, although I was less of a fan. Red Alert 3 wasn’t as good, so don’t bother, but Red Alert 2 was brilliant.

Now, once you got used to the process you needed to go through, and devise strategies that you were comfortable with whether it was producing hundreds of foot soldiers, a squad of mammoth tanks or chasing nuclear power it didn’t matter. You could always win with your own style of attack.

Now, the hard part is learning which of these strategies worked best, you could win with all of them in the campaign mode, but in multiplayer, where the really skilful generals battled you had to know who you were up against.

Initially, it was the same old story in Command and Conquer.

Get to Nuclear power, wipe out the opponents power plants, and then pick them off. This was successful at first, but then my opponents started to improve. Whilst I was busy flying to get the nuclear weapons up, my opponents learnt that they could be me by taking out my financials by blowing up my harvesters with 5 odd demolition trucks.

Just like business, my competitors found weaknesses in my process and adjusted and started hammering me. With no money I couldn’t gain nuclear dominance and they slowly picked me off.

Then I discovered I could build an Iron Curtain, protecting certain units just before my opponents decided to bomb them, this delayed my building of the missile silo too much though, and my win rate wasn’t that great.

I needed a distraction in between which came in the form of mammoth tanks. A couple of these on the base (destroying the Tanya they planned to rip through my buildings) gave me enough time to get the Missile Silo up and running again and tearing away their power plants as before.

Like in Red Alert 2, Business strategies change.

You have to adjust to your opponents tactics, and you have to make one step forward before you can make the second, third, or win the battle.

If you haven’t had a chance yet, play the game Command and Conquer, and spend hours and hours on it. It’s one of those games that you should feel appreciative about playing, because your learning. You’re learning how to take over the world, and drive your career forward at the same time. The cut scenes are highly amusing as well. I realised whilst writing this that I might have (definitely) been in love with Tanya throughout my childhood. And who wouldn’t be?

 

Affirmative Comrade?

 

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