The Wizarding World of North America?

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Have no fear, my fellow wizards. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter is being expanded with a collection of original writing entitled “The History of Magic in North America”.

For those of you who aren’t aware, later this year, we will have the privilege of a new instalment in the body of film of the Harry Potter series, titled “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”.

The film revolves around author Newt Scamander, a wizard from New York City braving his local community of witches and wizards. All of this is going to be occurring about 70 years before the original series.
Now, in her books, Rowling has referenced, mentioned and hinted to the magically-gifted outside of the European setting of Hogwarts, namely in the TriWizard Tournament and the Quidditch World Cup, as well as in history books and conversations.
A wise idea, “The History of Magic in North America” is going to act as a bridge, enabling readers and fans to safely traverse into the new film with a ground understanding of the setting, environment and type of people in North America at that time, without feeling lost or confused regarding the vast differences between this movie and the ones we grew up with and adored.
When visiting the Pottermore site, viewers are welcomed to the first two pieces of the new story: “Fourteenth Century – Seventeenth Century” as well as “Seventeenth Century and Beyond”, both offering unique new information.

Fourteenth Century – Seventeenth Century

While this piece isn’t very lengthy, it boasts some interesting information, mainly revolving around America’s younger years, touching on the “No-Maj” people; for you muggles, feel free to call yourself a No-Maj, as that is exactly what it is, No-Magic. Strangely enough, Native American wizards didn’t use wands, a tool which originated in Europe.

Seventeenth Century and Beyond

Here, we are introduced to the high danger of having magical powers in North America during this time, as well as the “Salem Witch Trials“, a tragedy for the wizarding community, hangings and deaths of ever-so-many wizards and No-Majs alike. Also, we are told about the challenging “Scourers“, a collaboration of misfit, rogue mercenaries plaguing chaos on the Wizarding World.
The next several chapters will be releasing on Pottermore day by day. They will be named: “Rappaport’s Law” and “1920’s Wizarding America”. If you’re like me, you’ll stay glued to your computers, anxiously waiting for the next chapter, clicking ‘refresh’ until either your hand gets sore or your computer stops working; the occurrence of either one counts as a successful venture.
I’m very happy and grateful Rowling has taken it upon herself to not only keep her fans and audience engaged, eager and anticipated, but also considers the importance of filling the dark void of uncertainty, making our transition over to North America that much smoother.
Heck, I think I might go and reread all of the originals now before the release of “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” releasing on the 18th of November, starring Eddie Redmayne, directed by David Yates and screenplay by J.K. Rowling.

Let’s hope, that just like at the conclusion of the Harry Potter books, once we reach the end of this new segment, we will be able to say:

“All was well.”

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